There are quite a few buildings in Manhattan that have metal door frames in some or all of the apartment.  We recently had a client that was looking to remove a metal doorframe in their UWS apartment and before it came out, we had to do some minor removal of the surrounding floor boards.  This was an older apartment (20's), but we've also worked in apartment from the 70's where the customer was having the metal door frame removed and we had to do some floor repair/finishing around the lower edge of the frame.  The videos show the actual cutting of the floor and removing of the marble saddle.  We make cuts straight down into the wood (plunge cuts) with a tool called a Multi Master which is made by Fein.  These are some more pictures and videos of the board removal process:

 

There's inevitably damage to a wood floor when removing an old metal doorframe. This is some of the pre-demolition floor work that often takes place before the removal of the frame itself.

After all the boards have been removed and the opening has been closed up, we then went ahead and repaired the floor with new white oak.  Depending on how close a match you're looking for, new wood may not be the best route to go as the graining and color may be too big a mismatch.  The new wood may also not take the stain well.  If this is the case, we'll typically try to salvage from a closet or another floor that might be getting ripped up so that we know the wood will be a match.  In this case, the doorframe was being closed up and some of the repaired boards were going to be covered with base molding, so new wood worked out fine.  There are some more pictures of the repaired wood and then the finished product so you can see what to expect from repairs like this after the refinishing has been done. 

This is a shot that shows the repaired location under the doorway along with a partially sanded section of the existing floor.  An important to notice here - than can influence how well things blend together - is how different the color of the new wood and old wood are when they have no finish on them.  You can see that the old wood has a more of a yellow tinge to it than the new wood.  Going with a brownish and/or darker stain - see next picture - can help get help mitigate this issue.  Apologies for the light/shadow issue with the picture.

This is a shot that shows the repaired location under the doorway along with a partially sanded section of the existing floor.  An important to notice here - than can influence how well things blend together - is how different the color of the new wood and old wood are when they have no finish on them.  You can see that the old wood has a more of a yellow tinge to it than the new wood.  Going with a brownish and/or darker stain - see next picture - can help get help mitigate this issue.  Apologies for the light/shadow issue with the picture.

Cleaning up the doorframe after removal

Location where the repair was done at the old doorframe is to the left.  This shows a full line along the edge of the wall that was repaired with new white oak.

Location where the repair was done at the old doorframe is to the left.  This shows a full line along the edge of the wall that was repaired with new white oak.

This is the location under the old door opening that had the new strip of wood installation.  This repair blended well although this has a lot to do with the color selected.  This is also wasn't a large repair in a central location in the room so if there is a color or graining difference, it's not particularly noticeable.  Another thing working to our advantage is that a good portion of the board will be covered with the new base and shoe molding.

This is the location under the old door opening that had the new strip of wood installation.  This repair blended well although this has a lot to do with the color selected.  This is also wasn't a large repair in a central location in the room so if there is a color or graining difference, it's not particularly noticeable.  Another thing working to our advantage is that a good portion of the board will be covered with the new base and shoe molding.

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AuthorMarc Ringel